Here’s what Páirc Uí Chaoimh looks like one year since demolition work started

It’s been a year since demolition work began on the home of Cork GAA, Páirc Uí Chaoimh, writes Stephen Barry.

We check in on the progress so far, and look back at the steps between then and now.

Here’s what Páirc Uí Chaoimh looks like one year since demolition work started

April 2015

In case you’ve forgotten, here’s what the old stadium looked like in its final moments before being demolished.

There’s a pic of the stadium’s initial construction, back in 1975, in there too, but with less big cranes visible than are there today.

Video: Eddie O’Hare

May 2015

Large sections of the covered Southern Stand were already removed within a month of demolition work commencing.

September 2015

Here’s a close up of some demolition work from last September, after the levelling of the uncovered Northern Stand was added to the plans.

January 2016

The first of the tower cranes was in position by the start of the new year as the demolition work expanded to all four sides of the ground, with corrosion of steel reinforcements cited among the reasons for the extra demolition.

April 2016

Behind schedule but up and running, Páric Uí Chaoimh is a hive of activity as building work is underway.

Video: Eddie O’Hare

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