Gunners to seek compensation from Dutch

Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger has revealed the club intend to seek compensation from the Dutch football federation over the ankle injury suffered by striker Robin van Persie.

The forward suffered ankle ligament damage during Holland’s friendly against Italy on November 14 and is not expected to return to action until April next year.

Wenger, quoted in several Sunday newspapers, said: “We are working on this with our lawyers at the moment and we are definitely going for it.

“I expect financial compensation for the damage it can make to the championship and the salary involved. It is especially frustrating to lose your players for the rest of the season in a friendly game.”

Wenger claims the Dutch federation (KNVB) misdiagnosed the injury.

“Initially, the Dutch FA said it was a small problem and Robin called me to see if he could go and see this Serbian wonder doctor and it was OK.

“It was only when he came back here that we realised there was much more damage. In Holland they have a fight between the national doctor and the guy that did the surgery on Robin.

“We just want to go for it because there are a lot of things that have not been done properly after he was injured.”

The KNVB gave their version of events in a statement issued to Press Association Sport on November 29.

The statement read: “Directly after Robin van Persie got injured in the friendly of the Dutch national team versus Italy, the doctor of the Netherlands team diagnosed an ankle ligament problem.

“The Arsenal striker went to the hospital in Amsterdam on Sunday, where further examination (an MRI scan) confirmed the diagnosis of the medical staff of the Netherlands team – Robin van Persie had a ruptured ligament of his right ankle.

“The medical staff of the KNVB contacted Arsenal club doctor Gary O’Driscoll the same Sunday to inform him about the outcome of the investigation and to transfer the medical record regarding this injury. The scan was also handed over to the medical staff of Arsenal.”

The issue of compensation for players being injured on international duty is a complex one.

A landmark case involving Belgian club Charleroi and FIFA over a player injured in a friendly international was discontinued after the G14 group of clubs which was supporting Charleroi was superseded by the European Club Association.

An agreement has been reached with FIFA and UEFA to pay compensation to clubs for players injured in World Cup or European Championship finals matches, but there is nothing formal in place for qualifiers or friendlies.

Some associations, like the Football Association, take out insurance to cover players on international duty.

West Ham are reported to be seeking recompense from the FA following the enforced retirement of Dean Ashton, who suffered a serious ankle injury in an England training session in 2006.

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