GAA's gate revenues for 2018 drop 14%

GAA's gate revenues for 2018 drop 14%

The GAA's overall gate revenues for 2018 has fallen to €26.9m, a decrease of €4.8m from the 2017 figure.

The figures were released in the GAA’s Financial Report for 2018, which was presented at Corke Park today.

The report found that the 14% decrease is in part due to the two major replays in 2017.

Mayo's quarter and semi-final replays against Roscommon and Kerry in 2017 would have accounted for €2m of the €4.8m decrease.

The report also found that while 1.5m people attended games in 2018, attendance has "decreased by 18% across the 2018 Championship series."

2018 saw a restructuring of the Championship structure, which added two additional games bringing the total to 47.

The report highlighted that a record amount has been spent on Games Development and Player Welfare in 2018.

€19.3m was spent last year with €11.1m being spent on Coaching and Games Development and €8.2m on Player Welfare and Organisational Development.

Total revenue for the GAA for 2018 was €63.5m.

The GAA’s Finance Director, Ger Mulryan, said on GAA.ie that the association was in good financial health.

He said: “Our balance sheet is strong and there are no third-party borrowings. Loan balances owed to Central Council from our units are sizeable at €33m, but most importantly this loan book is performing, and repayments are on track.

“Our common objective is to deliver the adequate resources to seamlessly allow all our units to develop and prosper.

“In conclusion, our financial well-being is due as always to the tireless dedication of thousands of club and county treasurers nationwide. Their role is a difficult but valued one.

“The Association is also indebted to the members of the National Financial Management Committee, National Audit & Risk Committee and National Risk & Insurance Committee for their hard work, insight, support and expertise.

“It is thanks to the hard work and expertise of all these people that I am pleased to be able to report favourably on Central Council’s 2018 financial results, and to look forward to exceeding expectations in 2019.”

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