Holden: No need for black card sin-bin in hurling

Holden: No need for black card sin-bin in hurling
Joey Holden says the yellow card is sufficient warning for adefender who pulls down a forward running towards goal. Picture: James Crombie/Inpho.

Kilkenny full-back Joey Holden has rejected the idea of a black card in hurling, saying a yellow card is enough sanction for a cynical pull-down of an attacking player.

Extending the black card sin-bin sanction to hurling has been mooted, though the experienced Holden reckons it isn’t needed and that the number of instances of players being pulled down on the way to goal is rare.

Asked if a yellow card was enough punishment in the case of a forward who is through on goal being cynically pulled down by a defender, Holden nodded.

“Yeah, it certainly doesn’t happen that much, but I would say so, yeah,” he said.

“What does a forward expect? I know they want to get through on goal, but we’re defenders: We have to stop them. And if you go down this road, you’re ruling out the art of defending, which is as important as the forward’s art of scoring, I believe.

“The game of hurling is for everyone. You have goalkeepers who are skilful, you have defenders who are skilful, and you have forwards who are skilful.

“Rewarding one area over another area of the game, like, I think it should be just fair for all.

For me, if the yellow card is given, then that person is on a warning and if they do it again [they’re off]; that’s enough to suffice. They’ve had the warning: You’re not allowed to do that again; you’ve had your warning and that’s kind of it.

Those who favour a black card for hurling would argue that cynical play should simply not to be tolerated and deserves a greater punishment than a booking.

The response to football’s sin-bin, so far, has been generally positive .

“I don’t think there’s that much cynical fouling in hurling, to be honest, that I see, anyway, so I don’t think there’s a need for it,” said Holden, who added that he’s surprised the idea has even been brought up.

“Yeah, I was a bit surprised. I hadn’t heard that it was potentially coming in and then there was a report that it could be coming in. It could possibly be an option, but I haven’t heard much about it and, as I say, I wouldn’t be a fan of it.”

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