Cora Staunton to become first female GAA star to release an autobiography

By Stephen Barry

Cora Staunton is set to break another barrier for Irish female GAA stars.

The Mayo footballer's autobiography, Game Changer, will be published in October.

The highest-scoring forward in the history of ladies football created more history last year, going from a veteran to a newcomer in becoming the first Irish footballer to enter the AFL Women's draft.

"Growing up there were very few books of this nature, so I hope by releasing my autobiography it paves the way for more of its kind and inspires the next generation," said Staunton.

Published by Transworld Ireland, the book promises to explore "the triumphs of her career and the personal struggles that have plagued it".

That includes the death of her mother in 1998, when Staunton was 16 years old, as well as the conflicts she and her teammates have experienced in the under-resourced world of female sport.

Since her senior debut, aged 13, Staunton has won four All-Irelands, 11 All-Stars and five Club All-Irelands with Carnacon. She's also won an FAI Women's Cup in soccer and a Connacht Women's League in rugby.

She said of the book: "It has been a challenging process but I have enjoyed recalling the rollercoaster that is my life!

"I hope that people enjoy reading it and that they can relate to some of the highs and lows I’ve experienced along the way."

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