Final-fence chaos and an incredible comeback in 'all-time great' Cork race

Final-fence chaos and an incredible comeback in 'all-time great' Cork race

By Stephen Barry

Nothing we saw at Cheltenham came close to matching the final-fence drama of this Cork point-to-point race.

The Prestbury Park meeting may have been the highlight of the year for many Irish racing followers, but those at Ballyarthur, near Fermoy, witnessed a truly memorable finish earlier this month.

The Village Inn Bar adjacent hunt maiden for novice riders was progressing over the three miles as expected until the approach to the last, as Artic Fever seemed to be the only horse left in the race.

We could try to describe the drama of multiple refusals, unseated riders and the possibility of a race with no finisher, but it's best to judge for yourself...

In the end, after nearly 10 minutes of energy-sapping racing on heavy ground, Two Sams took the win "by a process of elimination".

As the commentator Declan Phelan said, it's a win trainer Michael 'Trixie' Barry and jockey Gary Noonan are "never going to forget" in "one of the all-time great adjacent hunt maidens".

Thanks to Kilworth & Araglen Point To Point and IRIS - Racecourse Integrity Services for the footage.

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