Falkirk target final tickets

Falkirk will be looking for at least 20,000 tickets from the Scottish Football Association for next month’s Homecoming Scottish Cup final against Rangers at Hampden.

The Bairns reached the showpiece occasion for the first time since 1997 with a 2-0 win over Dunfermline at the national stadium yesterday in front of just 17,124 fans.

The other semi-final on Saturday between the Ibrox men and St Mirren, which Rangers won 3-0, attracted 32,431 supporters, around 20,000 short of capacity, but there is bound to be the usual high demand for tickets for the May 30 final.

Alex Totten was Falkirk boss when they lost to Kilmarnock in 1997 and now works for the Bairns’ commercial department.

The former Rangers assistant manager told PA Sport that the race for tickets among excited Falkirk fans has already begun – and he will be looking for at least 20,000 to satisfy demand.

“I have already had fans on the phone this morning asking about tickets and they haven’t even been printed yet,” he said.

“There is a great sense of excitement in the town already, just like the last time we reached the final.

“It will be a fantastic occasion against Rangers with a full house of 52,000 at Hampden.

“We took 22,000 fans to Ibrox for the final in 1997 and so we will be looking for at least 20,000 tickets this time although it would be great if we could get 25,000.

“We had around 9,000 to 10,000 fans at Hampden yesterday but the final is a day when everyone wants to go, the grannys, the grand-dads and children.

“It will be another great day and the whole of Falkirk is looking forward to it.”

Totten’s role at the club ensures he is as keen on financial matters as he is the playing side but he admits surviving the relegation battle remains “imperative” for the club.

Falkirk are bottom of the Clydesdale Bank Premier, four points behind Inverness with five games remaining, the first of which is against Motherwell on Saturday.

Totten said: “When we got to the final in 1997, the club earned around £1.5m (€1.66m) from the cup run but it’s too early to say how much we will make this time.

“But whatever we make will be welcome, of course.

“However, we know that it is still imperative to retain our SPL status, that is the most important thing.

“Getting to the final will give the players a big lift and they should go out against Motherwell on Saturday with their chests puffed out.

“It will be an interesting game because Motherwell are not in the relegation battle, so how will they go about it?”

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