Enda Kenny got a bit confused about the Ryder Cup on Sky Sports yesterday

Irish weather was doing it’s four-seasons-in-one-day routine at the K Club yesterday, which meant play was suspended twice during the final day of the the Irish Open.

That left the TV commentary teams with air time to fill and Sky Sports decided to take advantage of the presence of the Taoiseach on the golf course.

Enda Kenny agreed to have an on-air chat about golf, but it did not go well.

Kenny appears to the think the Ryder Cup, the biennial battle between golfers from Europe and the US, is in fact contested by Britain and the States.

To be fair to Kenny, that was originally the case. But given it has been Europe v US since 1979, he probably should have caught up by now.

Irish viewers were not impressed.

Maybe stick to photo ops and avoid punditry in future Enda.

Read next: Rory McIlroy wins Irish Open with stunning comeback victory

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