Dónal Óg Cusack: 'Would I be interested in managing Cork someday? Course I would'

Dónal Óg Cusack: 'Would I be interested in managing Cork someday? Course I would'

Dónal Óg Cusack has expressed an interest in being the new Cork hurling manager.

Cork GAA are on the lookout for a new bainisteoir after it was announced that John Meyler was to step down.

Meyler served a two-year term as Cork manager, with his last game being the Rebel's quarter-final defeat against Kilkenny.

Former Cork goalkeeper Dónal Óg has now thrown his hat into the ring to take over.

Speaking on RTÉ's GAA podcast, Cusack said "of course" he would be interested.

"Would I be interested in managing Cork someday? Course I would," the three-time All-Ireland winner said.

"I played for Cork since I was under-14 and every level since.

"But whether this is the right time, what's the process, what are Cork looking for?

"Is it one year, two year, three year? Does the manager bring in his own people?

"What role does that new high-performance director [have], and again...I think that the biggest decision that Cork have and the biggest appointment that is going to be made by Cork over the next while is that high-performance person."

Cusack also hailed Meyler's "fierce" Munster Championship title last year but added that "people would have felt that this year, and the results really showed that, that the team hadn't advanced."

Cusack is among a number of people being tipped to take over, with former boss Kieran Kingston and Cusack's former team-mate Ben O'Connor in the mix.

The All-Star has previously served as a coach for the Clare hurlers for two years in 2015, helping that side win a National League in 2016.

Speaking about the vacant hurling manager position, Cork County Board chairperson Tracey Kennedy has said they are looking for someone with a “strong coaching background” to replace Meyler.

Speaking to the rish Examiner, Kennedy said there are no limits.

"Whenever the group sits down to look at filling this vacancy, there is no-one on or off the table," Kennedy said.

She added that a new manager is likely to get a two-year term, as Meyler had been given.

"I know from discussions with the county secretary and executive that two-year terms are probably what is being favoured going forward," said Kennedy.

"The three-year term was important for [Cork football boss] Ronan [McCarthy] because it was a rebuilding situation. I expect two-year terms will continue to be the norm."

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