Do people want the GAA to actually give them money at the gate? - Dick Clerkin defends rise in ticket prices

Do people want the GAA to actually give them money at the gate? - Dick Clerkin defends rise in ticket prices

Former Monaghan star Dick Clerkin insists the GAA provides great value for money.

The two time Ulster Championship winner is defending the decision to raise ticket prices.

Fans have questioned the 33% hike for the upcoming national league, while an All-Ireland final ticket will now cost €90.

A number of changes have been announced to ticket pricing for the upcoming season.

Tickets for All-Ireland senior hurling and football semi-finals, for example, will increase by €5, while tickets will jump by €5-10 for the All-Ireland final itself.

Ticket prices for matches in the top Allianz League divisions will also see increases.

The GAA has said the decision is based on business values, and noted clubs will ultimately benefit.

Clerkin feels families are looked after well.

He said: "I am going to Dublin and Monaghan on Sunday, I'm taking my two boys for free. If I wanted to go into town for a coffee and a bun, it'd be a tenner.

"It's great value, what can you bring your children to now in modern-day Ireland for free? Do people want the GAA to actually give them money at the gate?"

GAA President John Horan feels it will make more money for clubs.

Horan said: “The decision to raise the ticket prices came about, because we made a commitment to increase the revenue to club development grants from €2 million to €4 million over a four-year period.

“The only way we could actually come up with the money was actually to raise tickets."

Former GAA President and Fine Gael MEP Sean Kelly, meanwhile, said there hasn't been an increase since 2011.

Speaking on Newstalk Breakfast, Mr Kelly observed: "Nobody likes to see increases, but at the time of an improving economy and rising costs it's inevitable that every organisation is going to look at its prices.

"I think it's more a question of what use is made of the money, rather than just the increase. In fairness, there hasn't been an increase for a few years... that's eight years ago, so in that sense they've held the line fairly well."


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