Dnipro goalkeeper scores wonder goal, but it's cruelly disallowed

By Robert McNamara

Goalkeepers bustling into opposition boxes for late set-plays is commonplace in modern football.

Seeing them score is rare enough but seeing them score from their own half, well, that almost never happens.

So, imagine the dismay of Dnipro goalkeeper Jan Lastuvka who had his moment of glory taken away from him when a free-kick he took from deep inside his own half bounced over his counterpart in the Zorya goal.

The referee officially disallowed the goal for a push by an outfield player but the goal wouldn't have counted because the free-kick was indirect.

Darn rules!

Dnipro did go on to win the Ukrainian Premier League game 2-1 but poor old Lastuvka missed out on the chance to appear on compilation videos alongside the likes of Pat Jennings, Asmir Begovic and, erm, Quillan Roberts forever more.

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