Cork leagues wrap

Cork leagues wrap

Sarsfields moved to within two points of RedFM HL Division 1 leaders Bride Rovers – with two games in hand – after a comprehensive victory at home to Douglas on Saturday night.

The Riverstown side were 4-22 to 0-9 victors, their fifth win in seven games, to move them to 29 points.

Dylan Walsh, Cian Darcy and Luke Hackett all scored first-half goals as Sars retired with a 3-11to 0-5 with Cormac Duggan netting in the second half. Walsh was on free-taking duties and contributed heavily on the point-scoring front with Aaron Myers, James Sweeney and Hackett all waving white flags too.

Ballymartle got their second win of the campaign as they enjoyed a 2-17 to 1-11 victory at home to Na Piarsaigh. Killian McCarthy had a goal for the Riverstick side in the first minute following a great move and, with the wind behind them, they led by 1-6 to 0-7 at half-time.

Seán O’Mahony’s frees helped them to add to that advantage in the second half while Dan Dwyer got the second goal to leave them in a commanding position.

At Glounthaune, a last-minute long-range free from Jamie Coughlan earned visitors Newtownshandrum a 1-19 each draw with Erin’s Own.

Centre-back Conor Twomey featured heavily for Newtownshandrum as they led at half-time by 0-12 to 0-9. Coughlan’s goal helped them to establish a lead with Johnny Geary and David O’Connor on the scoresheet too. Eoghan Murphy had seven points for Erin’s Own before retiring injured and they were level thanks to Jack Sheehan’s goal around the three-quarter mark. Mark Collins helped to put them ahead, but Coughlan had the final say.

Division 2 leaders Mallow made it six wins from seven as they overcame Castlelyons by 1-22 to 1-10 on Sunday morning, while Fr O’Neills edged Fermoy by 2-9 to 1-10.

Courcey Rovers remain second following their impressive 2-23 to 0-10 triumph against Youghal on Saturday with third-placed Kilworth beating Carrigaline by 3-17 to 0-22.

GAA podcast: Dalo was wrong. Emotional Cork. Limerick's Plan B? Tipp back it up. Ref justice

Anthony Daly, Ger Cunningham and TJ Ryan review the weekend's hurling.

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