Catterick takes second look

Officials at Catterick will have a second look at the track at 10am to decide if this afternoon’s meeting can take place.

Clerk of the course Jonjo Sanderson inspected the North Yorkshire course at 7.30am but was not able to make a firm decision.

He said: “It is frosty and only 50-50 at the moment but the forecast is for it to get better. However, the wind-chill factor could be a problem. We have got clear skies now and the sun is out and temperatures are rising slowly but it is not cut and dry at this stage.”

More in this Section

Home thoughts from abroadHome thoughts from abroad

At war for the survival of Rugby CountryAt war for the survival of Rugby Country

Bournemouth end long wait for a win at SouthamptonBournemouth end long wait for a win at Southampton

City boss Fenn still looking for first win; Dundalk close in on titleCity boss Fenn still looking for first win; Dundalk close in on title


Lifestyle

Gráinne Healy only started running regularly a few years ago. She’s already completed 50 parkruns. She tells Rowena Walsh what motivates her.Ageing with Attitude: Parkruns and quiet Friday nights

Against popular wisdom and flying a plane made from bamboo, wire and bike handlebars, a Co Antrim woman blazed a sky trail for aviation and for the independence of women, writes Bette BrowneMagnificent Lilian Bland blazed a trail for independence of women in her plane of bamboo

The epic battle for the bridge at Arnhem, as depicted in the blockbuster 'A Bridge Too Far', saw the Allies aim to end the war by Christmas 1944, but failed as a huge airborne assault force failed to take the last bridge across the Rhine. In an extract from his latest book 'A Bloody Week', Dan Harvey tells the story of one of the hundreds of brave men from Ireland who gave their all to the Allied campaignThe bridge to war: Dan Harvey's new book looks at the Irish who went a bridge too far

Several days ago, the long-awaited sequel to Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale was released.Lindsay Woods: I have always consumed books at a furious pace

More From The Irish Examiner