Byrd takes outright lead at AT&T Classic

Byrd takes outright lead at AT&T Classic

Jonathan Byrd carded his second consecutive six-under-par 66 to take a three-stroke lead after the second round of the AT&T Classic last night.

Tied for the lead with four other players after the weather-interrupted opening round, the 30-year-old Byrd fired seven birdies and a lone bogey to reach 12-under 132 at the halfway mark at TPC Sugarloaf.

Starting on the back nine, the 2002 PGA Tour Rookie of the Year birdied his first two holes and was 10 under at the turn after two further birdies.

He then made three straight birdies from the third to fifth to go to 13 under before dropping his only shot of the day at the par-five sixth.

Byrd, who is seeking his first PGA Tour victory since last July's John Deere Classic, has a three-shot lead over Ryan Palmer and Kenny Perry, who both shot 69s to move to nine-under 135.

Perry bogeyed the fourth but rebounded with four birdies while Palmer recovered from a double bogey at the fifth, carding an eagle, five birdies and two bogeys in an eventful second round.

Charles Howell III (69), David Toms (69) and Parker McLachlin (70) are tied for fourth at eight-under 136 with Heath Slocum (68) and Colombia's Camilo Villegas (69) a further shot back in joint seventh.

Defending champion Zach Johnson shot a two-under 70 and is tied for 10th on five under.

More in this Section

Gatland says Wales will keep feet on the ground after reaching rankings summitGatland says Wales will keep feet on the ground after reaching rankings summit

Manchester City denied late winner by VAR as Spurs steal a pointManchester City denied late winner by VAR as Spurs steal a point

Kilkenny return to Championship final after second half comeback against TippKilkenny return to Championship final after second half comeback against Tipp

Late Forrest strike ensures Celtic avoid cup upset against DunfermlineLate Forrest strike ensures Celtic avoid cup upset against Dunfermline


Lifestyle

Five things for the week ahead with Des O'Driscoll.Five things for the week ahead

From Liverpool’s beat-pop to Bristol’s trip-hop, Irish writer Karl Whitney explains the distinctive musical output of individual cities in the UK, writes Marjorie Brennan.Sounds of the City: The musical output of individual UK cities

As landlords’ enclosures of villages and commonages during England’s industrial revolution drove landless countrymen into the maws of the poet William Blake’s “dark Satanic mills”, a romantic nostalgia for the countryside began to grow.Damien Enright: Great writers took inspiration from walking

Take no risks, ‘do all the right things’, and you’ll lead a comfortable, but dull, existence. ‘Living dangerously’, on the other hand, yields ‘highs’ of excitement usually followed, alas, by pain andRichard Collins: Live fast and die young or last up to 500 years

More From The Irish Examiner