Bohs forced to drop Bob Marley jersey design over image rights

Bohs forced to drop Bob Marley jersey design over image rights

A League of Ireland club has been forced to scrap plans to release a jersey featuring Bob Marley over image rights.

Bohemians FC say the Bob Marley representative agency contacted them over its planned 2019 away shirt featuring an image of the reggae legend.

The Dublin club sourced the picture from a photo licensing company, but it turns out the company did not have the rights.

Bohemians has been forced to redesign the shirt after the group said it could not license the image to the club.

The club has said that anyone who has registered to buy the 2019 away jersey can either get a full refund, a shop credit note or a new redesigned away jersey. Details on how to do so are available here.

In a statement, the club said: "We greatly regret that we cannot offer the original jersey as designed but believe that the new design, while maintaining the colour scheme for a nod to Dalymount’s musical history, also brings with it a powerful message.

"The clenched, raised fist, is a symbol of solidarity and support used to express unity, strength and resistance.

"The League of Ireland faces the might of the EPL every day, Bohemian FC – like other 100% fan-owned clubs – faces the challenges of the privatisation and commercialisation of football across the globe.

"We have decided to give 10% of our profits from this jersey to a fund, which will continue the already fan-led and previously fan-funded initiative of bringing people living in Direct Provision to games at Dalymount Park. These are among the most unrepresented people on our island."

Lucky Khambule, co-ordinator of Movement of Asylum Seekers in Ireland, said: “MASI warmly welcomes this initiative by the Bohemian Football Club. Bohemians have been assisting MASI and bringing people in Direct Provision to games for several years and are very proactive on numerous other social issues too.

“We hope the jersey is a huge success and allows for many more trips to Dalymount Park in 2019 for those affected by Direct Provision.”

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