When crash-time houses become homes

When crash-time houses become homes
Courtwood Garryduff 4 b

HOUSES at the Courtwood development, in Cork’s outer suburb of Rochestown at Garryduff are in the process of moving from being houses, to becoming homes.

  • Location:Rochestown, Cork
  • Price: €595,000
  • Size: 233 sq m (2,500 sq ft)
  • Bedrooms: 4
  • Bathrooms: 4
  • BER: B3

Originally built in 2008, as the Irish property market imploded in upon itself, this scheme of just 15 tall, architect-designed houses spanning no less than six different layout varieties, sort of sat on its haunches for a while, having come too late to the lofty price party.

They’d initially launched at prices coming up to the €900,000 level, but none sold, and instead a number were finished out, fitted out, and rented out, with the location next to Garryduff Sports Centre, woodland walks, and a new national school as specific locational attractions.

When crash-time houses become homes

By the end of 2014, Garryduff’s Courtown turned up as a bulk sale, where Nos 1-15 finally changed hands for €7.973m (this may have been net of Vat): since then, a number have sold again, individually, or have been finished and resold.

The Register shows seven individual houses then selling for €415,356 apiece, and in the past year some of those seven have sold to final occupiers, at prices from €585,000 (No 1) to €645,000 (No 12.) No 14 went for sale last October, guiding €630,000 with Sean McCarthy of ERA Downey McCarthy, and now he brings No 4 Courtwood to market in its wake, at a guide price of €595,000.

Set by the entrance to Courtwood and sharing the houses’ feature finishes of Liscannor stone and cedar windows, it’s got about 2,500 sq ft, four first floor bedrooms with two en suites, and has a cracking good attic level with a further suite of rooms,
finished out and carpeted, and open to a range of family-friendly uses, from play to offices, music making, gaming, and sleepovers.

When crash-time houses become homes

At ground it has two interconnected reception rooms, a kitchen/dining area beyond with block-paved patio access, and a study.

BER is a decent B3, and it’s ready for new occupants to move into as it’s freshly decorated, with good carpets, other flooring, and fitted kitchen and bathrooms.

VERDICT: It’s been a long and sometimes bumpy road, but Courtwood has come home for 2020.

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