Living it large within a walk of Carrigaline

No7 Briarfield is a 4,500sq ft dormer on a site of 0.3 of an acre. A two-storey rear wing was added 10 years ago, says Tommy Barker.

BIG when constructed a few decades back, and then extended 10 years ago, no 7, Briarfield, a dormer, stretches back on its site of 0.3 of an acre.

One of eight similar, detached houses built in a cul de sac off the Ballea Road, and within a walk of Carrigaline town centre, it’s close to the Carrigaline Court Hotel.

Thanks to its two-storey rear wing, which was added on to include a first-floor home office and spacious playroom, with store and a further living room underneath, it now measures 4,500sq ft, and it is priced at €675,000, by selling agent Michael O’Donovan, of Savills, Cork.

The site is private, thanks to mature grounds, high hedges and landscaping. Thoughtfully extended, the house is now probably as deep on the left-hand side as it is wide across its broad, dash-and-brick facade.

Sales at Briarfield are few and far between: No 4 was offered at €475,000 in 2004, and was swiftly bid up a further €100,000, but no sale result is on record. No 7 was offered two years ago, at €780,000, and that price was cut back to €720,000 in early 2017, but it wasn’t sold.

Now, there can’t be too many homes in the wider Carrigaline hinterland with 4,500 sq ft, and even fewer so close to the town’s Main Street.

No 7 is set at the back of the niche Briarfield, up a brick-paved avenue fringed with laurels and with leylandii around its site perimeter, and its roof sweeps down from the ridge to form a sheltering ‘skirt’, with support columns on the left of the entry hall, and there’s a sun-room/bay window pushing out to the front on the right-hand side, with a 23’ by 14’, maple-floored family room within, with double aspect and corner-set fireplace.

Across the hall is a second reception room, as large at 24’ by 11’, and this, too, has a fireplace: the kitchen/diner is to the back, with oak units and terracotta tiled floor.

Yet another open fireplace crops up in the extension’s second family/sitting room, at the far end of the extension, overlooking the rear garden, and reached past a play room and a large store room.

Overhead, the original part of No 7’s first-floor is home to four bedrooms, two of which have en suites, as well as a main bathroom, while the house’s largest room is the linked games room with snooker table, and home office, up to 40’ long combined, and ending in a back wall with extensively glazed gable.

There is a fireplace here, with gas feed, positioned just where the rooms open one to the other, while to one side is a door out to a long, east-facing balcony with clear-glazed balusters overlooking the secure back patio and garden, which is big enough for ball games and barbecues.

No 7’s condition is very good, inside and outside, with an attractive drape of virginia creepers on the front and side walls. It has pvc double-glazing and oil central heating, and a C3 BER, while the preponderance of pine in the internal joinery is indicative of the decade of its construction, the 1990s, and flooring is a mix of timbers, including oak, maple and pine.

VERDICT: Plenty of big rooms, on a big site, at the town-end of the Ballea Road.

Location: Carrigaline

Price: €675,000

Size: 420 sq m (4,500 sq ft)

Bedrooms: 4

Bathrooms: 5

Best Feature: size


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