Buyer's jitters brings home back to market, with a price drop

Buyer's jitters brings home back to market, with a price drop

A period mid-terraced family home close to many amenities is back on the market, writes Tommy Barker.

Gardiners Hill, Cork City

€315,000

Size: 82 sq m (883 sq ft)

Bedrooms: 3

Bathrooms: 1

BER: G

Unprecedented times like these Covid-19 pandemic days, weeks and rolling into months are playing havoc right across our lives, from tragedies and traumas, to just irritating upsets and changes to rhythms and routines.

So it is with the property and construction sectors, where it’s hoped to return to some level of activity once more from next week onwards, as part of the nation’s phased returns to business.

The last few lockdown weeks have seen some few residential property market listings, lots of virtual viewings, appointments booked for future real, physical ones, and even, quite surprisingly, deals secured in the midst of some mayhem for people who just want their own roof over their own heads.

Auctioneer Gillian McDonnell of Sherry FitzGerald is one of those agents who says she has moved some house deals from the virtual viewing stages to ‘sale agreed,’ but sensibly won’t jinx them by revealing too much detail until contracts get signed.

Buyer's jitters brings home back to market, with a price drop

But, clearly, things can go either way. And, in the case of No 7 Blarney View, up by the top of Cork city’s Gardiner’s Hill, she’s had to return the period-era, mid-terraced home to the market after a buyer lined up and just close to signing off got last minute worries, and pulled out of the deal on a property which featured in these pages back in late 2019, then with a €340,000 asking price.

It’s guided this week on the Sherry Fitz relaunch at €310,000. Quite coincidentally, records here show it was also up for sale right back in 2006, just before the market peaked and plummeted. Back then, it was guided at the same sum, €340,000, with its front and back gardens just recently then done out with hard landscaping, and fresh young planting.

Buyer's jitters brings home back to market, with a price drop

Fast forward 14 years: the soft landscaping has blossomed in a picture comparison, from small shrubs to bushy plants put in in ’06; the hard landscaping has endured, and been added to further with the likes of a garden pergola/sit out spot, complete with Perspex roof capping.

Dating to the 1890s, No 7’s an attractive mid-terraced home of about 880 sq ft, with three first floor bedrooms, two ground floor reception rooms, it has a galley kitchen and a ground floor bathroom. It’s all presented attractively, with gas central heating (and gas stove) and double-glazing, yet scores a disappointing G BER.

Ms McDonnell says it has been renovated, both by the current owners (who did drylining among other improvements) and by previous owners, with windows replaced about two decades ago: several of the neighbouring homes have also had renovation works done more recently, and several have put in more appropriate-looking replacement sliding sash windows, some with shutter blinds, and look great.

Buyer's jitters brings home back to market, with a price drop

Blarney View’s an attractive terrace in its own right, even if there’s more than a hint of ‘blarney’ in the address. They row looks out over the Blackpool valley, with Blarney naturally in the frame, but it's a very distant point of visual reference: a telescope might be called for?

No 7’s vendors, with a young family and here for a number of years, are now trading up, says SF’s Ms McDonnell, who adds their home is bright, very attractive and welcoming, and is a pleasure to show off: while she’s done many previous physical viewings from its last period of marketing, right now she’s down to virtual viewings and started back in with her first just yesterday.

Buyer's jitters brings home back to market, with a price drop

It’s a good family home, she reckons, near to a national school and many amenities around St Luke’s Cross, Dillons Cross and the Glen Park, is within a downhill walk of the city centre. She expects interest from first-time buyers, as well as from traders-down who’ll appreciate the settled feeling of community.

Pleasant features of the house’s late 19th origins feature internally with high ceilings, some cornice work and an internal arch, original pine floors and shutters on the front sitting room’s window plus stripped pine door, several old fireplaces, some in cast iron, and the wide chimneypiece in the rear dining room has a gas stove fitted.

Separately, a small annex houses the galley-style kitchen, which is plumbed both for a washing machine and a dishwasher, with glass block wall over the sink.

Buyer's jitters brings home back to market, with a price drop

Outside, there’s a railed in garden with some decking and large stones around mature shrubs. Behind, steps led up to an elevated garden, also with hard landscaping, with an old back boundary stone wall topped with timber, planted up and has glimpses of the more modern Merrion Court homes to the east. The elevation helps it to get evening sunlight, and the garden includes a pergola and a timber shed.

The Price Register records the sale of the adjoining home, No 6 Blarney View, which had gone to market at €295,000 back in 2018 for €320,000.

VERDICT: The previous bidder’s last minute worries may be some other viewer’s good fortune.


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