Scott and Yeats to headline Irish contents sale at Sotheby’s

Scott and Yeats to headline Irish contents sale at Sotheby’s
‘Mahony’s Point, Killarney’ by Harry Kernoff at Sotheby’s in London next Wednesday.

THE global attention Ireland enjoys on St Patrick’s Day in normal circumstances is set to continue at Sotheby’s in London on March 18 with the auction of contents from 44 Fitzwilliam Square in Dublin.

The late property developer Patrick Kelly furnished his Dublin home with an array of Irish painting from the 18th to the 20th centuries, Georgian and Regency furniture, silver and decorative arts.

An exceptional William Scott entitled Deep Blues and five works by Yeats will highlight an auction which features highly desirable pieces such as a pair of Irish mirrors and marquetry tables in the style of the great Dublin maker William Moore.

The catalogue with 126 lots is online. It clearly demonstrates how the paintings in this graceful home were wonderfully complemented with furniture and decorative pieces amassed over 30 years of collecting.

The paintings by Yeats, including The Showground Revisited, painted in 1950 (£150,000-£250,000/€170,000-€282,000), Young Men, painted in 1929 (£150,000-£250,000/€170,000-€282,000), and Scott’s Deep Blues (£300,000-£500,000/€339,000-€565,000) are central to the collection.

There is art by Daniel Maclise, George Barret, Paul Henry, Roderic O’Conor, George Mullins, James Arthur O’Connor, John Butts, James Humbert Craig, Jeremiah Hoad, Louis le Brocquy, Erskine Nichol, William Sadler, William Ashford, Douglas Alexander, Nathaniel Hone and Harry Kernoff as well as many others including a set of 25 Views of Dublin by James Malton.

A pair of c1740 Irish giltwood and gesso George II mirrors supplied to Sankey Winter, Dean of Kildare, illustrated in Irish Furniture (2007) by The Knight of Glin and James Peill, carry an estimate of £20,000-£30,000 (€23,000-€34,000).

There is an estimate of £15,000-£20,000 €17,000-€23,000) on a c1760 Irish side table and one of £6,000-£9,000 (€7,000-€10,000) on a pair of late 19th/early 20th-century side cabinets in the manner of William Moore.

A c1810 Regency breakfront serving table is described as “possibly Irish” and is estimated at £10,000-£15,000 (€11,000-€17,000).

A George III crossbanded pier table is estimated at £12,000-£18,000 (€14,000-€21,000).

A Brussels tapestry from the 16th century is estimated at £20,000-£30,000 (€23,000-€34,000) and an 1879 London replica of the Ardagh Chalice is estimated at £3,000-£5,000 (€3,500-€6,000).

Viewing begins at Sotheby’s in London today and continues for the next four days.

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