Working Life with Dr Muslim Moula Buksh

Working Life with Dr Muslim Moula Buksh

Dr Muslim Moula Buksh of Affidea ExpressCare Clinic, Naas, Kildare

7.30am

The early morning routine is always the same. I get up, have a quick breakfast before helping my brother, who I live with, get his kids ready for school.

I do the morning drop-off which I love as it’s another chance for quality time with my niece and nephew. Once I’ve dropped them off, I set out for the Affidea Expresscare Clinic in Naas.

9.45am

I arrive before 10am and touch base with the staff. As the clinic is newly opened, there is a lot to do.

One of the first things on my list is to review the CT and X-ray reports that have taken place the night before to ensure that the diagnosis and paperwork are accurate for each individual patient.

The clinic is a walk-in facility with a consultant-led medical team.

10am

I begin seeing my patients. If we suspect a fracture, the first protocol is an X-ray.Depending on the damage, the patient may require an MRI. If referred for an MRI, we will take a brief history before booking the patient for an appointment.

One of the many reasons I enjoy working in this profession is that no two days are the same with each day presenting a new set of challenges.

1pm

Depending on how busy the clinic is, I always try to grab a quick lunch break.

1.30pm

I see any emergencies along with any other patients requiring attention.

Offering fast turnaround times without an appointment, the clinic treats minor injuries and illnesses such as fractures and sprains, lacerations requiring stitches, sports and DIY injuries, minor burns and scalds, eye and ear injuries, insect and animal bites, infections and rashes.

Following this, I check medical devices such as defibrillators to ensure that they are all working correctly.

To ensure the safe operation of medical equipment, it is important to regularly check them to make sure they are safe and fit for purpose.

6pm

The clinic starts to get busy again from 6pm onwards, as people drop in on their way home from work.

In between patients, I look at what medicines we have in stock to see if more need to be ordered in.

11pm

I arrive home and catch up with my brother, before having a late dinner.

12am

Finally, bed. I look forward to doing it all again tomorrow.

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