Game Tech: Need for speed gives us great fun

Game Tech: Need for speed gives us great fun

Speed is of the essence, especially for Awesome Games Done Quick (AGDQ), where players come together to finish their favourite games as quickly as possible.

But this annual event, which raised $3.1m for cancer prevention this year, isn’t just finishing games quickly — its growing quickly, too.

This year was the tenth incarnation of the event, which started in a basement on a single couch, where a handful of enthusiasts recorded their speedruns.

A decade later, AGDQ now runs twice a year in the US, hosting hundreds of people and streaming to millions online. This year’s event had a number of fun speed-runs. We’ve picked some of our favourites below.

Fallout Anthology

The goal of this speedrun was to complete the numbered Fallout games (1-4) in roughly two hours, total.

If you are new to speed-running, that will sound impossible, but watching the run explains everything.

The runner, TomatoAngus (better known without the ‘g’) breezes through Fallout 1 and 2 in a matter of minutes, by skipping all combat in the game and running straight to the key points of the story.

In both cases, he is able to exploit the game’s systems (such as wearing enemy armour to prevent them attacking you) in order to avoid conflict and hit the end game.

Things get even weirder in Fallout 3 and 4, where TomatoAngus creates a speed glitch by repeatedly jumping from a cliff and re-loading when his character hits the ground, causing the game to almost double his running speed by mistake.

That’s before we even mention the fact that TomatoAngus escaped the opening section as a teenager, complete with the character’s teenage voice lines instead of the adult lines.

Well worth watching for fans of the series.

Darkened Skies

Game Tech: Need for speed gives us great fun

A strange game, with an even stranger history. While completing this 2002 game in less than 50 minutes, the runner Lizstar also gives an explanation of the development. Bizarrely, Darkened Skies is a fully licenced Skittles game.

So while initially, it might appear to be a bad Zelda clone, you’ll soon be pulled into a medieval fantasy world where magic is powered by different colour Skittles.

This just makes Lizstar’s decimation of the game even more amusing. She spends quite a portion of the game ‘flying’ across sections of the levels by saving and re-loading as she jumps, which carries the jump moment infinitely.

Super Mario Maker 2 Race

One of the show’s pillar events this year and a true highlight. Eight speed-running supremoes were placed into teams of four, before being presented with a long series of extremely difficult fan-made Mario levels to complete.

The catch? They had never seen the levels before — and there was a timer of eight minutes on each level.

So the teams played musical chairs, taking turns to attempt each level, learning from their mistakes as they went along.

As an exhibition of sheer Mario genius, both in terms of playing and level design, it was beautiful to watch.

As always, however, the real highlight of AGDQ was the money raised for charity by the people watching at home.

You can still donate to the cause at the AGDQ website, plus all the videos from the event will be on the ADGQ YouTube channel in the coming week.

WITCHER WORLD

Meanwhile, Netflix can’t produce Witchercontent quick enough.

The Witcher series is almost certainly the most successful direct adaptation of a video game series to date, proving hugely popular on the streaming platform.

Yes, we know the story is based on the books, but the whole aesthetic of the show, right down to Geralt’s voice, was derived from 3D Project Red’s magnificent games.

The Witcher on Netflix has stayed very close to the aesthetic of the original game.
The Witcher on Netflix has stayed very close to the aesthetic of the original game.

Henry Cavill has openly admitted that he wanted the role based on the games alone.

Furthering that connection, Netflix have now released an interactive map of the Witcher world, much of which aligns with that of the games. And with names like Ard Skellig, we’re practically looking at a map of the Irish coast.

In addition, Netflix are rumoured to be developing an animated series based on The Witcher alongside the live-action version.

When asked about this by IGN, series producer Tomek Baginski said: “I don’t want to give away too much here, but who knows if we won’t see The Witcher in this style.”

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