A question of taste: Singer-songwriter Peter Broderick

A question of taste: Singer-songwriter Peter Broderick

US-born singer-songwriter Peter Broderick plays Triskel Christchurch in Cork on Friday as part of the Quiet Lights festival. The event continues through the weekend at various venues around the city with concerts from the likes of Lankum, Rozi Plain and Ye Vagabonds.

Best recent book you’ve read:

I have recently read both ‘Lynch on Lynch’ and ‘Room To Dream’, which are both books about the life and work of David Lynch. I share the same birthday as David Lynch and there is something about his character and creativity which resonates so deeply with me. So inspiring, so original!

Best recent film you’ve seen:

I finally saw Harold & Maude for the first time . . . wow, so good!!!

Best recent show or gig you’ve seen:

I recently shared the stage with Douglas Dare in a very intimate little venue in London called Servant Jazz Quarters. I had chills down my spine as he played, it was so beautiful. And the night before I shared the stage with Richard Youngs, who is such an inspiration… so brave and bold.

Best piece of music you’ve been listening to lately (new or old):

Recently my step-son was having trouble falling asleep, so I asked him if he’d like me to put on some music. He said yes, so I put on Brian Eno’s music for airports, and bang! He was out like a light! That’s one record I’ll never tire of.

First ever piece of music or film or show that really moved you:

When I was about 17 I saw a film called Noi Albinoi, by an Icelandic director called Dagur Kari. The film made such a huge impression on me, and I loved the fact that the director also made all the music for the film.

The best gig you’ve ever seen:

The first one that comes to mind is Dirty Three at Green Man Festival in 2009. There was a light misty rain going throughout the gig, and it was probably the most transcendent concert experience of my life so far.

Tell us about your TV viewing:

I don’t watch much TV, but I do get sucked into a series online every now and again. I recently watched all of This Way Up, created by Irish comedian Aisling Bea. It is so hilarious and also very touching.

Radio listening and/or podcasts:

I was really into The Rewild Yourself Podcast for a while. It stopped a few years ago, but it was a huge inspiration for my foraging adventures and research of indigenous life-ways. I also like the Joe Rogan podcast.

Your best ever celebrity encounter:

I recently performed at a festival at which Pamela Anderson was speaking. At the end of her talk/interview, they invited people to come on stage for a photo all together. I must admit that it was a surreal feeling to be standing five feet from this woman who I saw on the TV when I was a child. And I could see how people were trying to get close to her just for the novelty factor — I suppose myself included — but it made me feel really bad for her, that she gets so objectified like that.

You can portal back to any period of human cultural history or music event — where, when, and why?

Personally I would love to be a fly on the wall during some ceremonial music and dance gatherings among indigenous tribes, whether they be remote tribes of the amazon today, or perhaps a tribe of Native Americans before the white people arrived there, or some tribal African music gathering with all the amazing drumming and percussion.

You are curating your dream festival – which three artists are on the bill?

Stevie Wonder, Joni Mitchell, Arthur Russell... yay!

Any interesting ancestors?

There is also a connection in my family to Dr Arnold Kegel — I think he was something like my grandmother’s great uncle — he coined the term for the famous Kegel exercises for women!

Unsung hero:

It’s a shame that Arthur Russell was not more recognised while he was alive. He’s one of my greatest inspirations.

You are ruler of the music world for a day — what’s your first decree?

My first decree is to kindly ask Pitchfork and other music reviewers to stop using the number rating system. Let’s not reduce someone’s creative work to an arbitrary number.

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