Women treated for cancer but were not told of diagnosis by doctors

Women treated for cancer but were not told of diagnosis by doctors

It is reported that a number of women were treated for micro-invasive cancer in HSE facilities, but were never told they had the condition.

This is a cancer that has not yet spread locally and rarely develops into invasive cancer.

A report from the Irish Independent says the women were contacted as part of a review led by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

The affected women were sent letters informing them of the diagnosis during the review of cancer cases that was set up in the wake of the Cervical Check Scandal.

It is understood doctors removed cancerous cells during procedures - but that they had not spread, and were unlikely to develop into tumours.

The cases were notified to the National Cancer Registry, but it seems the women themselves were not told about the diagnosis.

The total number of affected women is not known at this point, but the Irish Independent reports that none of the women involved have cancer now.

The HSE has apologised for any distress cased to the women.

Explaining what these early cancers are, Dr Anthony Staines from DCU said: "The phrase micro-invasive cancer was used which is the very earliest stage of cervical cancer and it's a cancer that starts in the outer layers of the skin of the cervix.

"Then as it develops, it begins to invade into the deeper layers of the skin and that's the first stage. That's what they call stage one."

Digital Desk

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