Woman who broke wrist in alleged fall at Lillie's settles action for damages

Woman who broke wrist in alleged fall at Lillie's settles action for damages

By Ann O'Loughlin

A woman who broke her wrist when she allegedly tripped on stairs at the well known Lillie's Bordello nightclub has settled her High Court action.

Rachael Sheridan (pictured) had last week told the High Court she was leaving the nightclub four years ago at around 3am when her heel got caught and she fell to the bottom of the six steps set of stairs.

“I was in immediate pain in my left wrist. I was panicked: it looked disfigured , the bones in my wrist were protruding,” she told Mr Justice Michael Hanna.

The beauty account manager told the court she later had to have an operation on the wrist, was in a cast for five weeks and was out of work in total for six weeks as a result of the accident in May 2013.

Ms Sheridan (39) Darley Court. Palatine Square. Arbour Hill, Dublin had sued Noyfield Ltd with offices at Nassau Street Dublin and trading as Lillie's Bordello, Grafton Street, Dublin as a result of the accident on May 19, 2013.

She had claimed the stairs at the night club were fitted with anti-slip nosing which was defective and which constituted a dangerous slip and trip hazard.

She further claimed there was an alleged failure to ensure the anti-slip nosing was curved and tucked in against the carpet to prevent shoes snagging on the lip.

She claimed she is significantly limited in her everyday tasks and activities as a result of her injuries and her ability to progress in her career had been affected.

Noyfield denied the claims and contended Ms Sheridan was wearing inappropriate footwear and had allegedly consumed sufficient alcohol so as to impair her ability to negotiate stairs.

In evidence Ms Sheridan said says she suffers pain and has a complex regional pain syndrome since the accident. She told the court she "was well within her faculties" as she left the nightclub.

When the case came back before the High Court today, Mr Justice Hanna was told it had been settled and could be struck out.

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