Urban dwellers support graduated speed limits; those living in country mostly oppose them

Urban dwellers support graduated speed limits; those living in country mostly oppose them

A majority of people who live in towns and cities support new plans for graduated speed limits.

However, the survey by Behaviour and Attitudes for the Sunday Times shows a majority of people in rural areas oppose the move.

Last month, Transport Minister Shane Ross received the backing of cabinet to introduce new laws for greater penalties for drivers who exceed limits at higher speeds.

At the moment a driver who breaks the speed limit can be fined €80 and receive three penalty points.

Among the new proposals, four penalty points would be imposed on those exceeding the limit by 20 to 30 kms an hour.

Anyone driving above the limits by 30 km or more could face court action, a fine and seven penalty points.

A Behaviour and Attitudes Survey for the Sunday Times shows something of a rural/urban divide over the issue.

61% of those living in towns and cities back the moves, while 51% of those living in rural areas oppose the proposed measures.

The proposals have had some senior backing too, with Garda Commissioner Drew harris last month saying they were “appropriate and entirely logical”.

Figures show while road fatalities have dropped by 19% between 2014 and 2017 that serious injuries have jumped by 30%.

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