University of Limerick scientists find way of producing electricity from tears

University of Limerick scientists find way of producing electricity from tears

Scientists in Limerick have discovered a method of producing electricity from tears.

Pressure is used to create energy from protein crystals found in the saliva, milk and tears of mammals as well as the egg whites of birds.

It could revolutionise medical implants which release drugs into the body, researchers at the University of Limerick's Bernal Institute said.

Professor Luuk van der Wielen said: "The impact of this discovery in the field of biological piezoelectricity will be huge and Bernal scientists are leading from the front the progress in this field."

Piezoelectricity is a property of materials like quartz that can convert mechanical energy into electricity and vice versa. It is already used to create vibration in mobile phones and ultrasound imaging.

The capacity to generate electricity from this particular protein has not thus far been explored. Because it is a biological material it is non-toxic and could have innovative applications involving medical implants, lead researcher Aimee Stapleton said.

The high precision structure of lysozyme crystals has been known since 1965. They are easily made from natural sources.

Professor Tofail Syed from the University's Physics Department said: "Crystals are the gold-standard for measuring piezoelectricity in non-biological materials. Our team has shown that the same approach can be taken in understanding this effect in biology."

The team have been investigating simple fundamental building blocks creating piezoelectricity.

The discovery may have wide-reaching applications and could lead to further research into energy harvesting and flexible electronics for biomedical devices. Future applications of the discovery may include controlling the release of drugs in the body by using lysozyme as a pump that scavenges energy from its surroundings, the report authors added.

It may present an alternative to conventional piezoelectric energy harvesters, many of which contain toxic elements such as lead.

The researchers' report was published on Monday in the journal Applied Physics Letters.

More in this Section

Man hit garda with pellet gun shot, court toldMan hit garda with pellet gun shot, court told

Man arrested on suspicion of conspiring to commit murderMan arrested on suspicion of conspiring to commit murder

Governing body claims insurers refusing to indemnify drivers over motorsport accidentsGoverning body claims insurers refusing to indemnify drivers over motorsport accidents

Child poverty to affect 23% without economic recoveryChild poverty to affect 23% without economic recovery


Lifestyle

One iron-clad prediction for the future is that virtual reality will only get bigger and better. For now, however, virtual reality is content with taking baby steps forward, by allowing gamers to become iron-clad instead.GameTech review: Solid offering from Iron Man VR shows virtual reality getting bigger

Often dismissed as the unruly fashion child thanks to the denim cut-off, shorts are a major player this season. As seen on the runways of The Row to Saint Laurent, designers are re-discovering the charm of shorts. Versatility is their style power. From knee-length to the biker there is one to suit all, writes Paula BurnsHow to find the perfect pair of shorts this summer

The skincare tips to help with mask acne and irritationThe Skin Nerd: How to counteract the effects of 'Mask Face' on your skin

As the junior TV talent show returns for a new series, Georgia Humphreys chats to Will.i.am and the other mentorsWill.i.am and other mentors back for new series of The Voice Kids

More From The Irish Examiner