Truck hits Dublin city centre railway bridge for the second time in four months

Truck hits Dublin city centre railway bridge for the second time in four months

Another truck hit a Dublin city centre railway bridge for the second time in four months.

A cement Roadstone truck hit a bridge at South Lotts during the commuter rush hour at 8.40am resulting in Dart and train services being halted for a time between Pearse Street and Grand Canal Dock.

Iarnród Éireann tweeted: “ Services stopped between Pearse & Grand canal Dock due to a truck stuck under a bridge at South Lotts.”

However, at 9.04am Iarnród Éireann said the line had reopened with 15-minute delays as a result.

“Line has reopened between Pearse and Grand Canal Dock after truck hitting a bridge. services running up to 15 minutes late as a result.

Numerous commuters reacted to the stuck truck with one tweeting, “Surely there now needs to be a discussion regarding proactive versus reactive measures. That is height restriction bars before bridges.”

Another added: “Someones having a bad morning”.

An Iarnród Éireann spokesperson said: “It’s extremely important for truck driver to know the height of their trucks. If they don’t it has the potential for mass disruption especially at rush hour times.

There are flashing lights before the bridge warning drivers of the height. There are also height restrictions of all bridges on our website.

It is understood the air was let out of the truck tyres in an effort to clear the traffic chaos as quickly as possible.

In March, another truck smashed into a bridge in Dublin city centre causing widespread delays throughout the city.

The truck was wedged under the bridge causing train delays for hours as emergency services attended.

Services between Tara Street and Connolly were suspended as crews worked tirelessly to clear the truck and carry out an inspection of the bridge.

Gardaí closed off the busy road and put diversions in place.

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