Tourists find Ireland poor value for money

Tourists find Ireland poor value for money

Almost a fifth of tourists surveyed last year found their trip to Ireland poor value for money, it was revealed today.

The strength of the euro against the dollar and pound exacerbated the problem for British and American visitors, according to Fáilte Ireland.

The study also found one in five overseas visitors believed the cost of living was a disadvantage compared with other countries.

But despite the negative findings a massive 98% would recommend the country as a get-away spot, with scenery, hospitality and safety among the high-points.

Shaun Quinn, Fáilte Ireland chief executive, said high costs remain a key concern.

“Despite the high levels of satisfaction with Ireland’s tourism product, the cost of living in the wider economy remains an issue,” he said.

“However, our next survey should reflect the recent price readjustments which have occurred.”

The Overseas Visitors Survey was carried out among 5,700 holidaymakers who completed questionnaires between May to October last year.

It found 17% had not got value for money and 22% raised the high cost of living.

There were also concerns about the quality of the roads and signs, although the figure dropped from 17% in 2007 to 11% last year.

The research was published on the eve of Meitheal, the largest Irish tourism trade fair, which takes place in Dublin tomorrow and Tuesday.

Around 300 Irish companies and 281 overseas operators will take part, with over 20 countries represented.


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