Tighter security for airport police and customs staff following review

Tighter security for airport police and customs staff following review

New security checks are coming into force for airport police and customs staff at Irish airports.

Customs officers and police must now undergo security checks each time they move between restricted and public areas such as the arrivals hall, following a security review.

The Irish Times reports that it is due to the findings of a secret report by Paris-based inter-governmental airport security after it investigated risks at Dublin airport last year.

There are reports staff will have to remove protective gear including stab vests and handcuffs several times a day.

Minister for Transport Shane Ross defended the new protocol.

“While there is always an element of adjustment and inconvenience to individuals, these new measures are in the broader public and national interest,” he said.

“As threats and risk to civil aviation change over time, so too must the security response. This requires those people charged with providing security to be flexible and innovative,” he said.

The Minister added that he has “no intention, or desire, to interfere in softening any security measure that brings aviation security to a higher standard”.

He also noted that details about security rules remain highly confidential.


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