The Sunday Times have announced their Irish university of the year

NUI Galway has been named 'University of the Year 2018' in the Sunday Times University Guide.

It is the third time the institution has won the accolade, having won the inaugural title in 2002 and again in 2009.

Outperforming 21 other third-level institutions, NUI Galway's strong reputation as a centre of excellence in relation to medical technology, the arts and sciences and its impressive progression rates - which saw 88% of its students complete their studies - secured the award.

It was also found to have the best job prospects of any other Irish university, with an impressively low 3% graduate unemployment rate.

The college had a medical academy come on stream in Donegal, in the grounds of Letterkenny University Hospital, and launched the Science Foundation Ireland's (SFI) centre for research in medical devices in September 2016.

Alastair McCall, editor of The Sunday Times Good University Guide, said: "In the eight years since NUI Galway last won our University of the Year award it has continued to grow its global reputation as one of the great seats of learning.

"Some of its academics are among the most cited in the world and its reputation spans the arts and the sciences. The university brought in more than €65m of research income last year, evidence of the cutting edge at which many of the academics operate.

"It is also pivotal to the regional economy, rooted in its community and playing an active role at all levels. Its students are encouraged to volunteer and be part of that community and not just come to Galway as educational tourists.

"When Galway is the European Capital of Culture in 2020, the university will be at its heart; the newly-opened O'Donoghue Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance a bold statement of the importance of the arts to the university."

University President, Dr Jim Browne, whose 10-year term of office ends early next year, said: "We try to orient our programmes to support the ambition of our students and the needs of our economy in the longer term.

"We also try to have an appropriate balance of traditional academic scholarship and work-based learning. We have a target that 80% of our undergraduate students would have experiential learning.

"Our students and staff are the vital ingredient that make this University truly special and this award acknowledges their creativity, innovation and hard work."


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