Taoiseach has admitted some households will face higher bin charges

Update 4.20pm: People who are worried about the new bin charges are being advised to study their accounts.

The changes will see all flat-rates scrapped and make customers pay by weight, or by lift.

The idea is to make people put their waste in the correct bin.

Dermott Jewell from the Consumer Association of Ireland has this advice.

"All the records have been kept of every bin that has been lifted from your premises and the weight of it, so you can go online with your account number, check the weight of each bin that you've put out - that also gives you the ability to focus on okay, we're going to reduce there and there," he said.

Update 12:58pm: The Taoiseach has accused Sinn Féin of trying to exploit panic over the new system of bin charges.

Leo Varadkar's claims came after the new regime was attacked in the Dáil this lunchtime.

The changes will see all flat-rates scrapped and make customers pay by weight, or by lift. The system is supposed to incentivise recycling by cutting down on the cost of green bins.

Sinn Féin's Mary Lou McDonald said a €75 rebate for households with severe medical needs was "pathetic".

Taoiseach has admitted some households will face higher bin charges

Varadkar has admitted, however, that some households will face higher bills under the new rules.

"It is the case that some people will face a rise in bills…That will often be where private providers are providing a service below cost.

"Providing a service below cost is not sustainable…Even if it was given back to the local authorities they wuold not be able to provide a service below cost. In fact, the increase would potentially be even higher in those circumstances."

There have been calls today for local authorities to resume public bin collection services, in the wake of the latest developments in the Government’s efforts to introduce mandatory ‘pay-by-weight’ rubbish collection nationwide.

Gavin Mendel-Gleason, Workers’ Party representative for Dublin North West, called on Dublin City Council to immediately begin moving towards public bin collection.

“Waste collection is a basic service which impacts on our common spaces, public health and environment. It is right and proper that it would be provided on a not-for-profit basis by the state, not by profit-hungry private companies," he said.

“We saw first time round how private companies would use the bin charges to squeeze more money from households. Now, Fine Gael have allowed the exact same policy which caused the exorbitant hikes just a year ago, to be re-introduced with the exact same consequences - higher charges for shoddy, low quality services."

Mendel-Gleason said the idea that higher bin charges will lead to less dumping is not grounded in evidence.

He said: “If we want to seriously tackle waste, how about we make sure all recycling is free of charge? At the moment, many companies don’t even provide organic waste bins to customers in Dublin, and charge for recycling.

“And why is it the customer has to pay to get rid of wasteful packaging which is put on so many products by businesses - not the customer? Let’s penalise them for once.

“The crisis in our environment cannot be tackled while we allow private companies make profits off such a serious issue. We need a public service to prevent households being squeezed, to clean up our streets, and to reduce waste.”

Taoiseach has admitted some households will face higher bin charges

Earlier: The new bin charges are based on Donald Trump style economics according to Sinn Féin.

The changes will see all flat-rates scrapped and make customers pay by weight, or by lift.

The system is supposed to incentivise recycling by cutting down on the cost of green bins.

Sinn Féin's Environment spokesman Brian Stanley has said it won't work.

"This is the economics and policies of Donald Trump or Theresa May that's what this looks like.

"One group that is going to be badly affected is a low paid worker with a few children in nappies who is living in rented accommodation, who can't get onto a local authority waiting list, who can't get a mortgage to buy a house," he said.

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