Survey reveals stigma against those with mental health issues

Survey reveals stigma against those with mental health issues

Almost half of Irish people think people with mental health issues are untrustworthy, a new survey has found.

Research by St Patrick's Mental Health Services has found there is an inherent stigma surrounding mental health in Ireland, with treatment for such issues commonly perceived as a personal failure.

Some 47% of respondents said they believe people with mental health issues are untrustworthy, while nearly a third would not trust someone with a previous mental health problem to babysit.

Paul Gilligan, CEO of St Patrick's Mental Health Services, said that the findings are disconcerting.

"The research findings are very disappointing, but they're not surprising" he said.

"Only 53% of respondents agree that people with a mental health difficulty are trustworthy, 67% agree that Irish people view being treated for a mental health difficulty as a weakness.

"And I suppose even more disconcerting, 29% of respondents would not trust someone with a previous mental health difficulty to babysit.

"So they are quite disappointing."

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