Survey finds three in five adults support school strikes for climate change

Survey finds three in five adults support school strikes for climate change

A survey by Interactions has found that three out of five adults support children leaving school in order to protest for climate action.

Two out of five adults expect the demonstration to be very or fairly effective in tackling government inaction.

The survey also found that of the adults surveyed, most were unwilling to change their everyday lives to save the planet.

The nationwide survey was carried out among a cross section of 1,004 adults aged 18 and over.

Research Director at Interactions Claire Rountree said: "Our research focused on both adults and parents’ attitudes to the School Strike. These findings suggest that a third of adults believe the strikes would be ineffective.

"Which begs the question - why are 60% of parents supporting their children? Is it down to their social conscience or does it come down to good old fashioned peer pressure from the kids.”

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