Small group of Dubliners hold pro-Brooks protest

Small group of Dubliners hold pro-Brooks protest

A small group of protestors have held a demonstration in Dublin, calling for all five of Garth Brooks' concerts to proceed.

The group, reported to comprise about 50 people, gathered at the GPO – a site involved in the 1916 Easter Rising and common protest spot - before proceeding over the river and up Grafton Street.

Carrying banners reading "Garth Brooks Five in a Row" and promoting the Twitter hashtag #letsgo5inarow, the group attracted much attention from locals as they made their way across the city.

Reports this morning also suggested that Brooks' management team had been trying to reach Taoiseach Enda Kenny yesterday to discuss the issue, but were unable to reach him while he attended to the Cabinet reshuffle.

As things stand, three of the five planned concerts have been granted a licence, with Brooks refusing that offer and a follow-up of three evening performances and two afternoon matinees.


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