Sinn Féin propose €500 cut in student fees

Sinn Féin propose €500 cut in student fees

A €500 cut in student fees has been proposed by Sinn Féin who want third level contribution charges completely phased out in the coming years.

As students across the country receive first round CAO offers this morning, Sinn Féin education spokesperson Kathleen Funchion highlighted the massive cost young families face in sending a child to college.

"If we can try to reduce the cost of the fees it will go some way in helping students to first of all access third-level education and more importantly stay in third level education because a lot of people might attempt the first year and unfortunately they fall out of that because of the cost of it," she said.

Ms Function said reducing current student fees by €500 would cost €34m each year.

She said: “CAO application figures fell from 80,568 in 2017 to 77,171 in 2018, despite very little change in the number of students sitting their Leaving Cert. This is a significant drop of 4.2% and, with recent reports estimating the annual cost of college to be in the region of €12,800, one cannot help wonder if students are simply not applying to college because they know they cannot afford it.

“Diversity of college students is vital to the economy. Having people from different cultures, financial situations, and upbringings strengthens the education and life skills students receive from the third level education. Accessible third level education not only benefits students, it benefits both the economy and society as a whole."

More on this topic

Students warned over potential college accommodation scamsStudents warned over potential college accommodation scams

67% of DEIS students want to go to college but lack confidence in ability to do so67% of DEIS students want to go to college but lack confidence in ability to do so

How do regional college courses measure up?How do regional college courses measure up?

‘Imminent’ redress payment delayed‘Imminent’ redress payment delayed

More in this Section

Irish don’t understand HPV, says researchIrish don’t understand HPV, says research

Impasse persists at beef sector talksImpasse persists at beef sector talks

UCC scientists discover new way to reconstruct what extinct animals looked likeUCC scientists discover new way to reconstruct what extinct animals looked like

Thousands celebrate Tipperary All-Ireland Success in ThurlesThousands celebrate Tipperary All-Ireland Success in Thurles


Lifestyle

As Foo Fighters get ready to rock Dublin, Ed Power traces Dave Grohl’s journey from the wreckage of Nirvana to fronting another of the biggest rock bands on the planet. It’s a tale that also has a surprising Irish twistDavid Grohl: Playing through the pain ahead of Dublin gig

If you can fill a brown bin you can fill a compost heap, says Fiann Ó NualláinNo need to get in a heap about seasonal composting

Whether zipping through the air at 160kph, bouncing in a speedboat at 40 knots, or exploring the dream-like Italianate village of Portmeirion, North Wales is a revelation, and just a short ferry trip away.A weekend zipping through Wales

Kya deLongchamps says the top 1960s sideboards are as good an investment as the best of GeorgianWhy 1960s sideboards are as good an investment as the best of Georgian

More From The Irish Examiner