Sinn Féin calls for more opportunities to increase apprenticeships

Sinn Féin calls for more opportunities to increase apprenticeships

Apprenticeships need to become a popular choice for young people again, according to Sinn Féin.

The party wants to see 60,000 more apprentices over the next five years and three times the number of programmes on offer.

It also says student fees for apprentices should be abolished.

Party spokesperson on business Maurice Quinlivan said it would address serious needs in the economy.

He said: "A load of stakeholders the last couple of months, retail will tell you and construction will tell you, Construction Federation themselves reckon then need 112,000 people to be employed for the jobs and houses we intend to build in the next couple of years.

"They're simply not there, the skills aren't there. We've lost a huge skillset due to the economic collapse and people emigrating."

Digital Desk

More in this Section

The Lotto results are in...The Lotto results are in...

Flight diverts to Shannon with suspected fire on boardFlight diverts to Shannon with suspected fire on board

Irish tug sails over a third of the way to Canada to tow crippled cargo ship to safetyIrish tug sails over a third of the way to Canada to tow crippled cargo ship to safety

Two arrested in connection with murder of Malcolm McKeownTwo arrested in connection with murder of Malcolm McKeown


Lifestyle

These green pancakes are topped with avocado, tomato and cottage cheese.How to make Jamie Oliver’s super spinach pancakes

Who else can pull off a look described as a ‘hip-hop Michelin woman’?As her new EP drops, this is why there will never be a style icon quite like Missy Elliott

The classic white-tipped look is once again in favour, and celebs are loving it.The French manicure is back – 5 modern ways to try the trend

The A-Listers hiding in plain sight: As Rihanna is spotted at the cricket, who are the celebs who have been living under our noses in Ireland? Ed Power reports.Celebs in plain sight: The A-Listers living under our noses in Ireland

More From The Irish Examiner