Serial child abuser Ronan McCormack jailed for abusing two brothers

Serial child abuser Ronan McCormack jailed for abusing two brothers

A serial child abuser has been jailed for seven years for sexually abusing two brothers in the 1970s.

Ronan McCormack from Cloonloo, Co Sligo is already serving a sentence for abusing five boys when he was a GAA coach in the 1980s.

In his victim impact statement, one of the brothers abused by Ronan McCormack said he grew up feeling like damaged goods. He was 11 when he was first abused in 1972.

He spoke of missed career and relationship opportunities and years of depression and he said he still has vivid nightmares and often wakes up to the smell of his abuser’s body odour.

He was abused between 60 and 100 times at various places in Sligo including his family home, McCormack’s car, a boat and the cinema.

In 2014, McCormack was jailed for almost eight years for grooming and abusing five schoolboy footballers when he was a GAA coach in the 1980s.

Judge Martin Nolan said he was in his 30s when he abused the brothers. He said he should have known better but was clearly unable to control himself.

He then sentenced him to seven years in prison.

More in this Section

Twelfth of July to be marked with at-home celebrations in NorthTwelfth of July to be marked with at-home celebrations in North

Coronavirus has big impact on mental healthCoronavirus has big impact on mental health

Masks confusion as Cork GAA player tests positiveMasks confusion as Cork GAA player tests positive

Picture of garda’s son, 2, shown in interviewPicture of garda’s son, 2, shown in interview


Lifestyle

The long-tailed tit’s nest is an architectural marvel.Richard Collins: Altruism of the long-tailed tits or not

The flight that brought us home to Ireland after our seven months sojourn in the Canary Islands (half our stay intended, half not) was the most comfortable I’ve experienced in years. With a large plane almost entirely to yourself, you could again pretend you were somebody.Damien Enright: Wonderful to see the green, green grass of home

IRISH folklore is replete with stories of priests praying for fine weather to help farmers save their crops in wet summers. However, the opposite could soon be happening when divine powers may have to be invoked to provide rain. And not just for farmers.Donal Hickey: Praying for rain — in Ireland

Geography is often the defining factor for the destiny of an island. Those islands that lie close to the shore have often been snapped up by interests on the mainland and their morphology changed to something completely different.The Islands of Ireland: Tarbert morphed onto the mainland

More From The Irish Examiner