Roisin Shortall criticises 'dysfunctional' health service

Roisin Shortall criticises 'dysfunctional' health service

Roisin Shortall says the health service is dysfunctional "in lots of ways".

The Dublin North West TD and former Minister of State for Primary Care has been addressing delegates from the Irish Medical Organisation at their conference in Croke Park today.

Patient waiting lists and hospital overcrowding are among the topics being discussed.

Deputy Shortall says it is difficult to even trust the data we have on the health service;

"We've very little data about the health service," she said.

"It's dysfunctional in lots of ways and what we need to do is reform it.

"The Taoiseach was talking about 'can we believe the waiting lists?' - there is a problem there with data in the health service, but we also know that the reality is that very large numbers of people... are waiting for services."

More on this topic

IMO: Audit call could discourage doctors from working hereIMO: Audit call could discourage doctors from working here

Sláintecare Advisory Council’s omission of psychiatry questionedSláintecare Advisory Council’s omission of psychiatry questioned

Ageing population‘a time bomb’ for surgical servicesAgeing population‘a time bomb’ for surgical services

Latest: Locum doctors 'blackmailing' hospitals with strike over pay cuts, says consultantLatest: Locum doctors 'blackmailing' hospitals with strike over pay cuts, says consultant


More in this Section

HSE has spent almost €7m on private ambulances in eight monthsHSE has spent almost €7m on private ambulances in eight months

Nationwide safety inspections begin on construction sitesNationwide safety inspections begin on construction sites

Stormont Assembly to sit in symbolic session over abortion lawsStormont Assembly to sit in symbolic session over abortion laws

Irish scientists announce breakthrough on genetic skin diseaseIrish scientists announce breakthrough on genetic skin disease


Lifestyle

John’s chairs will last a lifetime, but he is also passing on his knowledge to a new generation, writes Ellie O’Byrne.Made in Munster: The ancient art of súgán-making is woven into Irish family history

More From The Irish Examiner