Revenue details settlements of almost €10m in latest tax defaulters list

Revenue details settlements of almost €10m in latest tax defaulters list

A nightclub owner, a doctor and an insurance company are among the tax defaulters hit with bills of nearly €10m in the last few months.

In its latest tax defaulters list, Revenue has said 43 settlements were made in April, May and June while more than €6.5m remained unpaid as of June 30.

Twenty-one of the settlements were for amounts exceeding €100,000, of which six were over €500,000.

Fines and penalties of more than a million euro were also imposed by the courts on people under-declaring tax or not declaring it at all.

There were 185 of those cases.

Revenue said: "Revenue vigorously pursues collection/enforcement of unpaid settlements.

"In some cases, collection/recovery of the full unpaid amount will not be possible (for example, company liquidation)".

A website consultant from Dublin has the highest bill on €888,000.

Michael P Doyle from Dartmouth Road in Ranelagh owes the under-declared income tax, but none of it has been paid yet.

Next on the list is medical service providers Mediserve Homecare Limited from Fitzwilliam Place in Dublin which owes €858,000 in underdeclared tax.

A vehicle test centre operator Sean O'Leary from The Faythe in Wexford was told to pay nearly €706,000 for non-declaration of income tax and under-declaration of VAT, while a Cavan-based wholesaler is to pay over €852,000 for the same offence.

A car dealer Noel Turley from Mountain North in Athenry, Co. Galway is to pay €799,000 for under-declaration of VAT.

There were also nine such cases where a court determined the penalty - with the total amount reaching just over €591,000.

And there were 176 where a court imposed a fine, totalling over €550,000.

In one instance, a Cork-based subcontractor faced seven charges for failure to lodge income tax returns.

He had to pay a fine of €28,000.

While a Wexford farmer was fined €17,500 for her failure to lodge VAT returns.

A window installer in Wexford paid a penalty of nearly €125,000 for under-declaration of income tax and non-declaration of VAT.

Also, a Monaghan-based property developer was ordered to pay €125,043 for non-declaration of Capital Gains Tax.

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