Renters close to Luas stops paying over €3,000 more per year than average Dubliner

Renters close to Luas stops paying over €3,000 more per year than average Dubliner

Renting a property close to a Luas stop costs over €3,000 a year more than average Dublin rents.

Details from Daft.ie found that renters are paying a premium of 15% to live within one kilometre of a Luas line.

Nearly 8,000 properties were surveyed over the first nine months of this year as part of the research.

Spokesperson for Daft.ie Martin Clancy outlines the price differences: "On the Luas Green line the average monthly rent is nearly €2,300 and that's for any property on the Green line and that's a €412 monthly premium compared to the Dublin average.

"On the Red line it's a little bit cheaper overall even though the most expensive stop is on the Red line.

"The average rent on the Red line is €2,081 and that's nearly €200 more expensive per month than the average in Dublin which at the moment is €1,884."

Speaking on some of the pricier areas, Mr Clancy said: "So the most expensive stop is Spencer Dock which is right in the city centre.

"The average rent for a two or three bedroom property around Spencer Dock is €2,793.

"Then looking elsewhere, the most expensive stop on the Green line is Charlemont -again pretty much in the city centre - and that's €2,646."

Digital Desk

More on this topic

Letter to the Editor: Exorbitant rents killing societyLetter to the Editor: Exorbitant rents killing society

Figures show Dublin has 4,663 short-term lets, but only 13 landlords have applied for permissionFigures show Dublin has 4,663 short-term lets, but only 13 landlords have applied for permission

Dáil passes bill calling for 3-year rent freezeDáil passes bill calling for 3-year rent freeze

'Time to give renters a break' - Sinn Féin advances rent freeze bill which Govt brands 'reckless''Time to give renters a break' - Sinn Féin advances rent freeze bill which Govt brands 'reckless'


More in this Section

Gardaí talk to three people as investigation into Cork father set on fire continuesGardaí talk to three people as investigation into Cork father set on fire continues

Garda tells inquest he shot Mark Hennessy as he believed he was about to slit Jastine Valdez's throatGarda tells inquest he shot Mark Hennessy as he believed he was about to slit Jastine Valdez's throat

Michael McGrath: Fianna Fáil not kicking pension decisions down the roadMichael McGrath: Fianna Fáil not kicking pension decisions down the road

Cork-based cybersecurity firm warn of 300% increase in cyber attacks from Iran Cork-based cybersecurity firm warn of 300% increase in cyber attacks from Iran


Lifestyle

Dr Sarah Miller is the CEO of Dublin’s Rediscovery Centre, the national centre for the Circular Economy in Ireland. She has a degree in Biotechnology and a PHD in Environmental Science in Waste Conversion Technologies.‘We have to give people positive messages’

When I was pregnant with Joan, I knew she was a girl. We didn’t find out the gender of the baby, but I just knew. Or else, I so badly wanted a girl, I convinced myself that is exactly what we were having.Mum's the Word: I have a confession: I never wanted sons. I wanted daughters

What is it about the teenage years that are so problematic for families? Why does the teenage soul rage against the machine of the adult world?Learning Points: It’s not about the phone, it’s about you and your teen

Judy Collins is 80, and still touring. As she gets ready to return to Ireland, she tells Ellie O’Byrne about the songs that have mattered most in her incredible 60-year career.The songs that matter most to Judy Collins from her 60-year career

More From The Irish Examiner