Renewed appeal for information as missing man’s mother travels to Ireland from Brazil

Renewed appeal for information as missing man’s mother travels to Ireland from Brazil

Update, 10.40am, March 27: The body of Caique Trindade De Oliveira has been found. 

Earlier: For a second time this week, Gardaí have renewed their appeal for the public’s help finding a Brazilian man who has been missing from Dublin for a week.

24-year-old Caique Trindade De Oliveira was last seen in the Clondalkin area on March 6.

He is described as being 5’10’’ with short black hair and brown eyes and was reported to be wearing a black t-shirt, a black jacket and black Adidas runners.

Caique wears glasses but he was not in possession of his glasses when last seen.

Gardaí have said they are concerned for his wellbeing and have called for anyone with information that may help find him to contact Gardaí.

His mother has travelled from Brazil such is the concern for the safety of her son, and these concerns are shared by the Gardaí.

“We are concerned for Caique’s safety; he has not been seen since he left his home on the 6th of March. He has poor English and may appear confused,” said Superintendent Brendan Connolly.

“I ask anyone with information or who can assist in locating him, including members of the Brazilian community, to contact Clondalkin Garda Station on 01 666 7600 or any Garda Station.”

- Digital desk


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