Queen arrives in Ireland




The British Queen will arrive in Dublin shortly to begin an historic four-day visit to Ireland.

It has been 100 years since a reigning British Monarch set foot on Irish soil the last time was in 1911, before Ireland had gained independence.

The flight carrying the Queen is touching down at Casement Aerodrome in Baldonnel.

The biggest security operation ever seen is now in place with thousands of Gardaí on the streets of Dublin and on the approach roads into the city.

At Baldonnel, 500 troops have surrounded the military base.

Protests are planned for later by those opposed to the historic visit, but Gardaí say they will be kept well away from the Queen and will not disrupt the visit.

The Flight BAE146 carrying the Queen touched down at a wet and windy Casemount Aeredrome in Baldonnel.

The Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore, his wife Carol, the Deputy Chief of Staff of the Defence forces Major General David Ashe, the Irish Ambassador Bobby McDonagh and the British Ambassador Julian King are here to greet her.

She will then be escorted from the plane down a red carpet, past an Air Corps honour guard, and towards the motorcade.

Eight-year-old Rachel Fox will present her with some flowers, before the final salute and an escort of honour.

The Queen and her royal entourage will then make their way to meet the President and the Taoiseach in Aras an Uachtarain.

Traffic will be stopped as she makes the short journey to the Phoenix Park.

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