PSNI given more time to question man in connection with death of baby

PSNI given more time to question man in connection with death of baby

A court has granted the PSNI an additional 36 hours to question a man arrested after the sudden death of a baby.

Major investigation team detectives are looking into the circumstances of the death, the PSNI said, and a man aged 31 was detained in the Craigavon area.

The death happened in the Keady area of Co. Armagh on Tuesday, the force said.

A post-mortem examination is due to determine the cause of death.

The man is being questioned at Banbridge police station.

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