Protest tomorrow aims to 'Make Cruelty to Animals History'

Protest tomorrow aims to 'Make Cruelty to Animals History'

Animal lovers will descend on Dublin's O’Connell Street tomorrow in a peaceful rally to 'Make Cruelty to Animals History'.

The event is being supported by more than 50 Irish animal rescue groups as concerns mount to the ongoing spate of extreme cases of cruelty.

The event aims to pressure the Irish judicial system to increase fines and jail time for those convicted, but also to ensure lifetime bans on animals where possible, along with a national registry for animal abusers.

The groups also want an end to the use of animals in circuses, a ban on the three remaining Irish fur farms, an end to lethal badger killing, hare coursing, fox hunting and an end to notorious puppy farms all of which were omitted from the Animal Health and Welfare Act (2013).

“Ireland is a haven for those who get sick kicks off abusing and exploiting animals,” says ARAN’s John Carmody.

“Our laws are not being used the way they should, and untold amounts of violence towards animals in all areas of Irish society are going unnoticed and unchallenged.

“There’s just a handful of Irish TDs who are supportive and proactive on animal protection measures which is indicative of the need for a change in the mindset and views on true animal protection.”

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