President leads tributes for novelist William Trevor

President leads tributes for novelist William Trevor

The President has led tributes to renowned novelist William Trevor, who has died aged 88.

Michael D Higgins described the playwright and short story specialist as a "writer of elegance".

The three time winner of the Whitbread prize for fiction and multiple Booker Prize nominee was from Mitchelstown, County Cork.

His first novel, A Standard Of Behaviour, was published in 1958 while he penned his last, Love And Summer, 50 years later. In between he earned a reputation as a prolific writer, penning more than 30 works.

Trevor, who lived in Devon for many years, was awarded an honorary knighthood in 2002.

"It is with great sadness that I have learned of the death of William Trevor, the distinguished novelist, playwright, sculptor and former teacher," said President Higgins.

"The work of William Trevor was widely regarded by his peers and critics as being among the finest literary works produced in Ireland.

"He was a writer of elegance, with words and themes."

Sending his condolences, Mr Higgins said the writer's loss would be felt most keenly by his wife Jane and sons Patrick and Dominic.

He added: "But his death is also an immense loss to all readers who value the power of evocative words and the beauty of a story well told."

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