Planning refusal for graveyard challenged in court

Planning refusal for graveyard challenged in court

The refusal of An Bord Pleanála to grant planning permission to build a graveyard and crematorium near the Dublin Mountains is being challenged in the High Court.

Last year, Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council rejected plans for the one-acre graveyard and the two-storey crematorium in Kilternan finding the proposals to be in breach of zoning.

More than 80 objections were lodged against the original planning application by Hantise Ltd and Ashman Properties Ltd for a 10-acre burial plot at Ballycorus Road at Kilternan.

The development would be on the site of a former lead mine and there were fears contaminants could be released into the local waterways once excavations began.

An appeal to An Bord Pleanála was rejected earlier this year and now those behind the development Hantise Ltd and Ashman Properties Ltd are legally challenging the board's refusal.

Their case is based on an alleged failure by An Bord Pleanála to circulate submissions by third parties that were relied on by the inspector in his report to the board.

The case was mentioned before the High Court today. A full hearing has been scheduled for October.


More in this Section

Social Democrat TD Roisin Shortall wants Ireland to make PPE themselves Social Democrat TD Roisin Shortall wants Ireland to make PPE themselves

Simon Harris urges public to further lower Covid-19 infection rateSimon Harris urges public to further lower Covid-19 infection rate

Two arrested in relation to spate of nationwide burglariesTwo arrested in relation to spate of nationwide burglaries

Man, 20s, killed in scrambler crash in CorkMan, 20s, killed in scrambler crash in Cork


Lifestyle

Des O'Driscoll looks ahead at the best things to watch this weekFive TV shows for the week ahead

Frank O’Mahony of O’Mahony’s bookshop O’Connell St., Limerick. Main picture: Emma Jervis/ Press 22We Sell Books: O’Mahony’s Booksellers a long tradition in the books business

It’s a question Irish man Dylan Haskins is doing to best answer in his role with BBC Sounds. He also tells Eoghan O’Sullivan about Second Captains’ upcoming look at disgraced swim coach George GibneyWhat makes a good podcast?

The name ‘Dracula’, it’s sometimes claimed, comes from the Irish ‘droch fhola’, or ‘evil blood’. The cognoscenti, however, say its origin is ‘drac’ — ‘dragon’ in old Romanian.Richard Collins: Vampire bats don’t deserve the bad reputation

More From The Irish Examiner