Pharmacists call on Government to exempt vulnerable patients from prescription levy

Pharmacists call on Government to exempt vulnerable patients from prescription levy

Pharmacists are calling on the Government to exempt all vulnerable patients from the current medical charge levy.

Irish Pharmacy Union (IPU) president Kathy Maher, has said some patients are not collecting their drugs, because they can’t afford the fee.

“Look at people who are homeless, palliative care patients and patients who have their medications changed on a weekly or daily basis.”

At the moment, even if you have a medical card you must pay €2.50, per prescription item, per month.

The issue is to be discussed at the Irish Pharmacy Conference which starts in Dublin later today.

The conference will be addressed on Saturday morning by Minister for Health Leo Varadkar, T.D.

“(The Government needs) to look at phasing out the prescription levy over a three year period and ultimately getting rid of it,” Maher said.

The conference will also hear a call for Government to recognise pharmacy as a crucial element of primary care, and to allocate the necessary resources to developing pharmacy services in order to alleviate pressures caused by the persistent GP manpower crisis and ensure easy access for patients and the public to safe, convenient and cost-effective healthcare.

More in this Section

Three hospitalised following serious crash in MonaghanThree hospitalised following serious crash in Monaghan

No winner of €10.7m Lotto jackpotNo winner of €10.7m Lotto jackpot

Recently uncovered love letter reveals director's 'schoolboy crush' on Maureen O'HaraRecently uncovered love letter reveals director's 'schoolboy crush' on Maureen O'Hara

Over 7,500 children waiting more than a year for occupational therapy assessmentOver 7,500 children waiting more than a year for occupational therapy assessment


Lifestyle

Katarina Runske owns Anna B’s bookshop in Schull, Co Cork. She is originally from Stockholm in Sweden and also owns and runs Grove House restaurant and rooms in the West Cork village.We Sell Books: ‘It is a great lifestyle and I am very fortunate’

Five things for the week ahead with Des O'Driscoll.Five things for the week ahead

From Liverpool’s beat-pop to Bristol’s trip-hop, Irish writer Karl Whitney explains the distinctive musical output of individual cities in the UK, writes Marjorie Brennan.Sounds of the City: The musical output of individual UK cities

As landlords’ enclosures of villages and commonages during England’s industrial revolution drove landless countrymen into the maws of the poet William Blake’s “dark Satanic mills”, a romantic nostalgia for the countryside began to grow.Damien Enright: Great writers took inspiration from walking

More From The Irish Examiner