Permanent TSB to cut rates on variable-rate mortgages

Permanent TSB to cut rates on variable-rate mortgages

Permanent TSB has announced interest rate changes for customers with variable rate mortgages.

More than 70,000 people with homeloans on rates of 4.5% will move to new rates starting at 3.7%.

The exact rate will vary according to how much customers owe and the value of their home. The highest rate charged - for customers who are in negative equity or whose mortgage is equal to 91% or more of the value of their home - will be 4.3%, which is 0.2% less than the current standard variable rate.

The Minister for Finance Michael Noonan had given banks until today to address rates which he said were too high.

Anyone wishing to avail of the new rates will be required to have their homes re-valued in August, with the bank saying it will pay for the cost of that.

There will then be a new valuation of the house relative to the loan, with the new loan rates due to kick in in September.

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