Parents being urged to know what their children can access online

There has been a mostly positive reaction to the cabinets decision to set the digital age of consent at 13.

It means anyone over that age can give permission for websites to access their personal information.

Ian Power is Executive Director with youth information website SpunOut.ie welcomes the decision but adds that parents should still be wary of what their children can access.

"Really what we need parents to focus on is the broader principals to know what is out there, to be aware and to be on their guard not obsessing over the details," he said.

"Rather opening a conversation with their children and making sure that if something goes wrong online that they know their child will come to them or to a trusted adult."

Parents being urged to know what their children can access online


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