Owners of derelict buildings in Cork given month to remove metal support beams

Owners of derelict buildings in Cork given month to remove metal support beams
The scene in North Main St in June

The owners of derelict buildings in Cork city which partially collapsed almost eight months ago have been given a month to remove huge metal support beams from the public footpath.

City officials said they want the A-frames propping up 63 North Main St to be moved inside the structure.

The owners have 30 days to respond to the instruction which is set out in a legal notice used under derelict sites legislation in what is the latest in a series of legal moves by City Hall against them.

It comes amid mounting criticism of City Hall’s handling of the issue which has blighted the city's historic spine since last June.

But business owners on the historic street said they have little hope of the issue being resolved any time soon.

Michael Creedon, of Bradley's Off-Licence, said given that the hoarding and support beams are still in place almost eight months on since the partial collapse of one of the structures suggests that the city council has done little to address the issue.

"What happened here last June was the culmination really of 15 years of neglect of this street," he said.

"There is no indication of anything happening to address it. This is at the city entrance to the street. It sets the tone for the whole street.

The council is being reactive, not proactive. And it's clear that the laws they have to tackle this kind of situation are just inadequate.

Three buildings, from 62-64 North Main St, have been sealed off behind hoarding since the partial collapse of one of them last June.

While an engineering report recommended demolition, City Hall instructed the owners to save the facades.

Number 63 has been propped up by large support beams since. Hoarding has been erected on the footpath outside the three buildings.

There was criticism in recent weeks after parts of the hoarding collapsed and litter built up inside.

City officials defended their efforts to resolve what they described as "a very complex issue" and said the council is using all of the various legislative tools available.

Director of services David Joyce said several departments are involved to tackle the situation in a "coherent and thorough manner".

He said a Section 11 notice was issued this week directing the relocation of the support beams inside the building to allow for the reopening of the footpath.

He added: “Issues which have been raised with regards to litter have also been followed up and are being actively pursued."

He also stressed that the area affected by the hoarding represents a very small portion of the overall streetscape and that North Main St remains open for business.

Cork City Council has actively promoted North Main Street and continues to encourage shoppers and visitors to continue to visit the uniquely Cork experience which is provided by the many local and unique businesses which are based on the North Main Street.

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